Course Description

Welcome to this complete and comprehensive, 20-hour introduction to Microsoft Power BI, fully updated for 2020.

This course is designed to familiarize you with Microsoft Power BI’s  business intelligence capabilities in the most logical order.

The course consists of 30 sections, arranged into seven groups that reflect the way in which Microsoft Power BI works and the order in which operations are carried out: Getting Started, Connecting to Data, Data Wrangling, Data Modelling, DAX formulas, Visualization, and Publishing & Sharing.

So, as you can see this course covers a lot of ground; there’s a lot to learn and a lot to remember.

That’s why each of the thirty sections in this course starts with an overview and ends with a section summary which recaps the key topics covered and reminds you where these techniques fit into the overall Microsoft Power BI cycle.

So, basically, you always know where you are within the grand scheme of all things Power BI.

The course also includes a 500-page PDF file which summarizes each section of the video course.

So, take your time and work your way slowly but surely through the course material; and when you’re done, you should find that you know Micrososft Power BI pretty well.

GETTING STARTED

The first group of sections is, naturally enough, Getting Started. This is where you’ll get up and running and download all of the resources you’ll need; and where you’ll get an overview of the Power BI product, Microsoft Power BI tenants and Power BI licenses.

CONNECTING TO DATA

Then we dive straight into using Power BI and the first business intelligence skill you need to master: connecting to data sources.

In these five sections, you’ll learn how to bring data into Power BI from Text Files, CSVs and Excel Files; as well as how to connect to a Folder of Data, either on your own file system or in a SharePoint library, and automatically combine all the files inside the folder into a single table.

You’ll also learn how to Connect to data on websites and how to scrape data from the web page itself.

And, naturally, you’ll get plenty of practice in connecting to Power BI’s most frequent data partner: SQL Server. You’ll learn how to work in import, DirectQuery and composite modes and how to retrieve data from both views and database tables, as well as by executing SQL statements.

DATA WRANGLING

Once you’re comfortable with getting data into Power BI, we’ll move on to the next stage in the Power BI cycle: Data Wrangling.

It’s very rare that the data you connect to is already optimized for reporting; so our four sections on data cleansing and transformation will fully familiarize you with using Power Query, the utility built into Power BI whose user-friendly interface allows you to carry out powerful and sophisticated transformation with just a few mouse clicks, as well as how to edit the underlying M language code generated by the interface.

DATA MODELLING

After mastering the first two steps in your Power BI journey, connecting to data and data cleansing, you’ll be ready to move on to the next stage: data modelling.

In this group of sections, you’ll learn how to combine the various tables that you need into a single entity called a data model.

DAX FORMULAS

Having created a data model, our next group of sections focuses on using the DAX language to add insights and enhancements.

We’ll look at the three types of calculation which you can create using the DAX language:

Calculated columns

Calculated tables

And measures

And we’ll get to grips with the most important function in the DAX language: the CALCULATE function.

And we’ll end the section by looking at DAX time intelligence functions which enable you to compare calculations based on different time periods, to provide such insights as year-on-year growth and year to date sales.

VISUALIZATION

Once we have built our data model, we’ll move on to the next phase in the Power BI development cycle: visualization and report creation.

We’ll start with what I like to call the big-picture visuals, those which give your audience with key metrics at a glance. As you’ll see in this section Power BI has three big picture visuals: the card, the KPI visual and the gauge.

And, of course, we’ll talk about many other visuals and visualization techniques as we work through these sections.

We’ll even look at using DAX measures to enhance the user experience by making titles change dynamically as users interact with them.

PUBLISHING AND SHARING

OK, so now we have a report, in our last group of sections, we will look at how we can make our content available to our intended audience.

First, we’ll look at publishing from Power BI Desktop into the Power BI service.

Then, you’ll learn how to create dashboards in the Power BI service and the different ways of adding content to them.

You’ll learn how to create app workspaces and how to grant access to fellow report developers, so that your team can collaborate on the creation of content; and how the different strategies for sharing that content throughout the entire organisation.

And, in our section on Power BI mobile, you’ll learn how to create reports and dashboards which are optimised for mobile viewing.

Online Training

G Com Solutions

Course curriculum

  • 1

    Section 1: Welcome

    • 1.0: Welcome to the Course

    • 1.1: Download the Course Files

    • Learning and Development Resources

    • Download Learning and Development Resources

  • 2

    Section 2: Getting Started

    • 2.0: Welcome to Section 2

    • 2.1: Installing SQL Server

    • 2.2: Installing the Sample Databases

    • 2.3: What is Power BI

    • 2.4: The Power BI Tenant

    • 2.5: Power BI Licensing

    • 2.6: Summary of Section 2

  • 3

    Section 3: Connecting to Text Files

    • 3.0: Welcome to Section 3

    • 3.1: Connecting to delimited text files

    • 3.2: Using UTF-8 Encoding

    • 3.3: Connecting to files in SharePoint

    • 3.4: Quick Practice

    • 3.5: Summary of Section 3

  • 4

    Section 4: Connecting to Excel data

    • 4.0: Welcome to Section 4

    • 4.1: Excel Data Objects

    • 4.2: Hidden Sheets

    • 4.3: Blank Columns

    • 4.4: Password Protected Files

    • 4.5: Total Row

    • 4.6: Quick Practice

    • 4.9: Summary of Section 4

  • 5

    Section 5: Connecting to a Folder of Data

    • 5.0: Welcome to Section 5

    • 5.1: Connecting to a Folder of Data

    • 5.2: Using a Sample File

    • 5.3: Quick Practice

    • 5.4: Connecting to SharePoint Folders

    • 5.5: Accessing SharePoint Sub-Folders

    • 5.6: Summary of Section 5

  • 6

    Section 6: Connecting to Web Data

    • 6.0: Welcome to Section 6

    • 6.1: Connecting to a web URL

    • 6.2: Connecting to web page data

    • 6.3: Quick Practice

    • 6.4: Summary of Section 6

  • 7

    Section 7: Connecting to SQL Server

    • 7.0: Welcome to Section 7

    • 7.1: Overview of Connecting to SQL Server

    • 7.2: Importing SQL Server Views

    • 7.3: Using SQL Statements

    • 7.4: DirectQuery Mode

    • 7.5: Composite Models

    • 7.6: Storage Mode

    • 7.7: Summary of Section 7

  • 8

    Section 8: Splitting and Combining

    • 8.0: Welcome to Section 8

    • 8.1: Removing Spaces by Splitting

    • 8.2: Splitting by Character Transition

    • 8.3: Combining Columns

    • 8.4: Summary of Section 8

  • 9

    Section 9. Extracting text

    • 9.0: Welcome to Section 9

    • 9.1: Extracting Character Ranges

    • 9.2: Text Between Delimiters

    • 9.3: Text Before Delimiter

    • 9.4: Summary of Section 9

  • 10

    Section 10: Transforming report data

    • 10.0: Welcome to Section 10

    • 10.1: Removing Unwanted Rows

    • 10.2: Fill Down

    • 10.3: Unpivot Columns

    • 10.4: Quick Practice

    • 10.5: Summary of Section 10

  • 11

    Section 11: Combining tables

    • 1100-Welcome to Section 11

    • 1103-Merge Queries Left Anti

    • 1102-Merge Queries

    • 1190-Summary of Section 11

    • 1101-Append Queries

  • 12

    Section 12: Data Modelling Fundamentals

    • 12.0: Welcome to Section 12

    • 12.1: Data Tables

    • 12.2: Calculated Tables

    • 12.3: Data Columns

    • 12.4: Calculated Columns

    • 12.5: Relationships

    • 12.6: Measures

    • 12.7: Hierarchies

    • 12.8: Rows of Data

    • 12.9: Summary of Section 12

  • 13

    Section 13: Creating Fact and Dim Tables

    • 13.0: Welcome to Section 13

    • 13:1: Creating a Schema for Power BI

    • 13.2: Creating views for Power BI

    • 13.3: Creating a Power BI login

    • 13.4: Connecting to views

    • 13.5: Using Relationship columns

    • 13.6: Using Merge Queries

    • 13.9: Summary of Section 13

  • 14

    Section 14: Date Tables

    • 14.0: Welcome to Section 14

    • 14.1: Disabling Auto Date_Time

    • 14.2: Creating a Date Table in Power Query

    • 14.3: Using an External Date Table

    • 14.4: Creating a DAX Date Table

    • 14.5: Mark as Date Table

    • 14.9: Summary of Section 14

  • 15

    Section 15: Relationships

    • 15.0: Welcome to Section 15

    • 15.1: Creating Relationships Automatically

    • 15.2: Creating Relationships Manually

    • 15.3: Creating a Date Column Relationship

    • 15.4: Creating Concatenated Column Relationships

    • 15.5: Summary of Section 15

  • 16

    Section 16: Hierarchies and Groups

    • 16.0: Welcome to Section 16

    • 16.1: Creating a Date Hiearchy

    • 16.2: Hierarchy Shortcut

    • 16.3: Creating Business Hierarchies

    • 16.4: Creating Groups

    • 16.5: Creating bins

    • 16.6: Creating Informal Hierarchies

    • 16.7: Summary of Section 16

  • 17

    Section 17: Calculated Columns

    • 17.0: Welcome to Section 17

    • 17.1: Calculated vs Computed Columns

    • 17.2: The DAX RELATED function

    • 17.3: The DAX RELATEDTABLE function

    • 17.4: Calculated Columns and Visuals

    • 17.9: Summary of Section 17

  • 18

    Section 18: Calculated Tables

    • 18.0: Welcome to Section 18

    • 18.1: CALENDAR and CALENDARAUTO

    • 18.2: The ADDCOLUMNS function

    • 18.3: The SUMMARIZE Function

    • 18.4: The FILTER Function

    • 18.9: Summary of Section 18

  • 19

    Section 1 9: Measures

    • 19.0: Welcome to Section 19

    • 19.1: Creating a Table for Measures

    • 19.2: Measures vs Implicit Measures

    • 19.3: Using the SUMX Function

    • 19.4: Using the AVERAGEX Function

    • 19.5: Comparing actual to target

    • 19.6: Calculating gross profit margin

    • 19.7: Comparing Margin to Industry Average

    • 19.8: Aggregating a Virtual Table

    • 19.9: Summary of Section 19

  • 20

    Section 20: The CALCULATE Function

    • 20.0: Welcome to Section 20

    • 20.1: Using CALCULATE with Booleans

    • 20.2: Using CALCULATE with FILTER

    • 20.3: Using CALCULATE with ALL

    • 20.4: Summary of Section 20

  • 21

    Section 21: DAX Time Intelligence Functions

    • 21.0: Welcome to Section 21

    • 21.1: DATESYTD, DATESMTD

    • 21.2: SAMEPERIODLASTYEAR

    • 213: The DATEADD Function

    • 21.4: PARALLELPERIOD

    • 21.5: Running Total

    • 21.6: The DATESINPERIOD Function

    • 21.7: Summary of Section 21

  • 22

    Section 22: Big Picture visuals

    • 22.0: Welcome to Section 22

    • 22.1: The Card Visual

    • 22.2: The KPI Visual

    • 22.3: Creating a Horizontal Slicer

    • 22.4: The Gauge Visual

    • 22.5: Grouping Visual Interaction

    • 22.6: Summary of Section 22

  • 23

    Section 23: Drill-Down and Drill-Through

    • 23.0: Welcome to Section 23

    • 23.1: Creating New Pages

    • 23.2: Adding Drill-Down to a Visual

    • 23.3: Using the Table Visual

    • 23.4: Top N Customers

    • 23.5: The Treemap Visual

    • 23.6: Configuring Visual Interactions

    • 23.7: Preparing a Drill-Through Page

    • 23.8: Creating a Drill-Through Button

    • 23.9: Configuring a Tooltip Page

    • 23.10: Summary of Section 23

  • 24

    Section 24: Further Visualization Practice

    • 24.0: Welcome to Section 24

    • 24.1: Creating a Trend Line Chart

    • 24.2: Creating a Drill-Down Treemap

    • 24.3: Top 5 Bar Charts

    • 24.4: Hierarchical slicer

    • 24.5: Customer Analysis Cards

    • 24.6: Customer Analysis Table

    • 24.7: Synchronizing Slicers

    • 24.8: Summary of Section 24

  • 25

    Section 25: Dynamic Titles and Conditional Formatting

    • 25.0: Welcome to Section 25

    • 25.1: The SELECTEDVALUE Function

    • 25.2: Concatenating Dynamic Text

    • 25.3: Conditional Formatting Rules

    • 25.4: Conditional Formatting Measures

    • 25.9: Summary of Section 25

  • 26

    Section 26: Publishing to the Power BI Service

    • 26.0: Welcome to Section 26

    • 26.1: Preparing a Report for Publishing

    • 26.2: MyWorkspace and App Workspaces

    • 26.3: Editing in the Power BI Service

    • 26.9: Summary of Section 26

  • 27

    Section 27: Power BI Dashboards

    • 27.0: Welcome to Section 27

    • 27.1: Dashboards and Reports Compared

    • 27.2: Creating and Branding a Dashboard

    • 27.3: Pinning Visuals to a Dashboard

    • 27.4: Using Pin Live Page

    • 27.5: Summary of Section 27

  • 28

    Section 28: Collaboration and Sharing

    • 28.0: Welcome to Section 28

    • 28.1: Collaboration and Sharing Overview

    • 28.2: App Workspace Permissions

    • 28.3: Uploading Excel Workbooks

    • 28.4: Publishing an App

    • 28.5: The App Consumer Experience

    • 28.6: Unpublishing an App

    • 28.7: Deleting an App from your App List

    • 28.8: Updating an App

    • 28.9: Sharing Individual Items

    • 28.10: Summary of Section 28

  • 29

    Section 29: Power BI Mobile

    • 29.0: Welcome to Section 29

    • 29.1: Getting Started with Power BI Mobile

    • 29.2: The Default Mobile Experience

    • 29.3: Using the Selection Pane

    • 29.4: Creating Mobile-Only Content

    • 29.5: Creating a Mobile Layout in Power BI Desktop

    • 29.6: Creating a Mobile Dashboard Layout

    • 29.6: Creating a Mobile Layout in the Power BI Service

    • 29.9: Summary of Section 29

  • 30

    Section 30: Refreshing Data

    • 30.0: Welcome to Section 30

    • 30.1: On premises Gateway Configuration

    • 30.2: Adding a Gateway to an Existing Cluster

    • 30.3: Adding A SQL Server Data Source

    • 30.4: Summary of Section 30